Sir Ken Robinson on creativity in schools

“All children start their school careers with sparkling imaginations, fertile minds, and a willingness to take risks with what they think,” he says. “Most students never get to explore the full range of their abilities and interests … Education is the system that's supposed to develop our natural abilities and enable us to make our way in the world. Instead, it is stifling the individual talents and abilities of too many students and killing their motivation to learn.” Sir Ken Robinson

Sir Ken Robinson is a former professor of art education and an expert on creativity. In this video that I stole borrowed from ted.com, you can see Sir Ken challenging the way we're educating our children. He champions a radical rethink of our school systems, to cultivate creativity and acknowledge multiple types of intelligence.

Why don't we get the best out of people? Sir Ken Robinson argues that it's because

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we've been educated to become good workers, rather than creative thinkers. Students with restless minds and bodies — far from being cultivated for their energy and curiosity — are ignored or even stigmatized, with terrible consequences. “We are educating people out of their creativity,” Robinson says.

You have to

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watch this video. He is certainly not a boring old professor:

One reason we at Euroasia believe every kid (and adult) should get the opportunity to learn a foreign language is because we need to expose people to a wider range of skills and possibilities. There's a chance that your child is not particularly adept at science or maths.  Exposing your child to language study is also great for developing creativity. And as Robinson says, in this day and age, creativity is just as important as literacy and we should treat it with the same status!

Here's a recent interview with Robinson published in The Guardian.

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About The Author

Kenneth is Director of Euroasia. He is passionate about languages and cultures.