How to gain authentic travel experiences

Came across this interesting article on stuff.co.nz today, entitled “Authentic? Tourists, you’re kidding yourselves”

Mexico

It’s beautiful in Oaxaca City. The Mexican town so easily charms you with its colonial architecture, its paved streets and brightly coloured buildings.

I’d been having a ball there, drinking in the bars, hanging out in the town square by the church, wandering the narrow streets, drinking in the flavour of the place. I’d never felt threatened or unsafe. I’d actually been wondering what all the fuss was about.

Gang warfare? Drugs and guns? Not in my Mexico. Definitely not in peaceful Oaxaca.

So it was kind of a shock when I found out about the shootings. I’d been chatting to a local woman, talking about the happenings in the town, when she mentioned the two teenage boys who’d been shot and killed – basically executed – in the town square a few nights ago.

When we’re in a foreign country, most of the time we have no clue what’s happening just outside. It’s in the interests of the host nation to keep it this way for the sake of their

That’s the thing about travel: you’re in a bubble. You can convince yourself that you’re getting the authentic experiences, that you’re mixing with the locals and taking in the culture and learning about a society, but if you’re only doing the normal tourist thing, coming in for a week or two and checking out the sights, then you know nothing.

A bit harsh, but that’s exactly what happens with people who endure the long flight from Auckland to Santiago, only to spend days lazing by the pool at the Ritz Carlton.

You’re barely scraping the surface. You’re floating along in the ideal world, sampling great food and chatting to friendly people and experiencing the absolute best that a country has to offer.

Nothing wrong with all that of course. However, if you wish to really enhance your travel experience, especially when you’re going to a non-English speaking country, I suggest you learn a bit of the local language. You don’t need to be able to talk politics in the local lingo, but being able to say hi and order a beer goes a long way towards building relationships. In turn this increases the likelihood of you finding a local friend who will take you further down the rabbit hole.

For those of you fortunate enough to escape the NZ winter, enjoy yourselves and hope you enjoy some “authentic travel experiences”.

Share this:

Three Ways Multilingualism Opens Doors In An Interconnected World

In the past, meeting a person who spoke more than one language was a rarity; before the advent of modern transportation and communication technology, contact with other nations was limited, so knowing more than your native tongue was not, for most people, a necessity.

However, today we live in a very different world. Cell phones, the Internet, and air travel have significantly increased our connectedness to people in other countries, and as the world becomes more globalized, those connections will continue to intensify.

Much has been made about the benefits of being multilingual on the scale of the individual; after all, people who know more than one language have been shown to have greater mental agility, better job prospects, and a sharper understanding of the world around them. But increasing multilingualism around the world also confers distinct advantages on our macro-level, global society.

Take a look at the following ways that greater multilingualism provides opportunities for increased understanding between (seemingly) disparate groups:

More Clear and Open Communication Between Governments

Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union, most national governments have recognized the importance of remaining in close contact with those of other countries around the world. Forging good relationships with other nations is a key to maintaining international stability, which is, of course, to our mutual benefit.

Multilingualism among world leaders allows governments to communicate clearly and openly with one another, and serves to break down barriers where they may exist. For example, it’s hard to forget President Kennedy’s powerful “Ich Bin Ein Berliner” (“I Am a Berliner”) speech, delivered in West Germany1963; he gave large portions of the address in German, thereby conveying his camaraderie with the citizens of the divided nation. Despite his famous mistake, in which he accidentally referred to himself as a jelly doughnut, the speech went far in establishing a relationship between the U.S. and West Germany.

It’s important for officials to be able to convey their wants and needs as directly and accurately as possible, especially in a tense situation. Multilingualism allows this, and it helps create a more tangible bond between leaders who are looking for common ground.

Easier Business Dealings and Negotiations

It’s true that the world is becoming more interconnected overall, but more specifically, business has reached international heights more rapidly than most other spheres. For the first time in world history, it’s fast and easy to conduct business transactions between distant nations, and multilingualism is the key making those deals happen.

Although it’s true that English is often the lingua franca, and thus the dominant language when it comes to business deals and negotiations, as countries in the developing world become bigger players in the world economy, multilingualism will be critical in high-stakes negotiations. This is because the nuanced nature of the back-and-forth involved in a business deal requires more than just a basic understanding of one another. Multilingualism among business professionals will allow both parties to convey their interests clearly and maintain a good working relationship. This is why major companies such as Apple, BMW, and Coca-Cola are actively recruiting leaders with the ability to speak more than one language.

Deeper Understanding of Other Cultures

It goes without saying that being multilingual will allow international travelers to interact with other cultures much more easily. For example, having an intimate understanding of Italian will make your trip to Rome a much more satisfying experience.

But the need for cultural sensitivity runs much deeper than a one-week summer vacation; as the expectation that we all become good citizens of the world increases, it’s critical to understand the ins and outs of other societies in more than just a superficial way. Increasing multilingualism provides us with the ability to understand the complexities other cultures in a genuine way. Language is complicated, and word choice means a lot in explanation and descriptions – multilingualism means that none of these fine distinctions will pass us by.

Multilingualism has the power to transform our world – consider learning a language to be a part of the movement!

_____________

This blog article was contributed by Sara Collins, writer for NerdWallet, a site that helps users stay informed about the best ways to save money on travel.

zp8497586rq
Share this:

Travelling Abroad: The Power of Physical Gestures

Hand gestures are frequently thought of as a universal language—one that everyone, regardless of country of origin, can generally understand to a certain extent. Even if you’re completely unfamiliar with the local language, pointing towards a train at the subway and then to your wrist will most likely indicate to a local that you need to know what time the train leaves. Read on to find out about some gestures that will be universally understood, and some seemingly common gestures that won’t exactly be well-received abroad.

Some Universal Gestures

Here are some gestures that will serve you well while travelling outside New Zealand, Australia or the United States, which can be appreciated and easily understood by locals everywhere.

  • A Smile

This simple movement of 12 facial muscles will go a long way for you in an alien country. Smiling is an effective way to convey that you mean well, making locals more willing to assist you as you tour their city. In Eastern countries especially, conveyance of emotion, through smiling for instance, plays a more pivotal role in communication than the mere verbal transference of information, that we are more accustomed to here in the West.  A smile can help you send out positive vibes as you travel through unknown countries.

  • A Head Bow

A gesture that will be understood world over, a slight bow of the head can be a positive gesture that can take the place of several common phrases, including greetings, thank you’s, and affirmative statements (i.e. “yes”, “of course”, “that’s fine”, etc.).  A head bow helps you come across as a humble, understanding individual, a necessary impression to create when you are the visitor.

  • Body Language

While travelling, maintain a fluid body language rather than a rigid one. A more relaxed body language will help you come across as a more amiable, approachable individual and will reduce the awkwardness of trying to find your way around an alien region.

Some Gestures to Avoid

Common gestures that one may assume are universal here in New Zealand or North America, may unintentionally offend some folks overseas. Read on to find out which ones to avoid.

  • The Okay Sign

This gesture formed using your thumb and forefinger may be a normal way to tell the chef that the meal’s delicious here in America, but in parts of Europe and Asia, this gesture is not appreciated in the least. In Greece and Turkey, this gesture has a vulgar, offensive connotation, while in the Middle East it is representative of the evil eye.

  • Pointing

“Is this the way to the local place of worship?” you ask innocently pointing down the road. A gesture not very well-received abroad, pointing is extremely rude is several nations. Instead, try indicating the direction in question using an open palm—save yourself the trouble of an unintentional insult.

  • Thumbs Up

Here in the West, the thumbs up gesture is used for all kinds of things, from signaling that all’s well to wishing someone good luck. However, in many regions worldwide, including the Middle East, South America, and West Africa, this gesture is a hideously obscene one. Avoid at all costs. Try a smile to indicate your happiness or satisfaction instead of risking this gesture.

Travelling is exciting, but can prove to be quite daunting when you don’t speak a word of the local language. Employ these gestures to more effectively communicate with locals and develop a positive relationship even with those whom you may not be able to verbally communicate with. Though your language may not be generally understood, simple actions like a smile or slight bow of the head are indeed universal. Just be sure to avoid those not-so-universal gestures wherever you are.

_____________

This blog article was contributed by Sara Collins, writer for NerdWallet, a site that helps users stay informed about the best ways to save money on travel.

zp8497586rq
Share this:

Meet Heather Warne – Japanese language student at Euroasia

You may have seen Heather Warne in the Mitre 10 ad currently running on TV.  Or at one of the many theatre productions she has been part of over the past few years.  A long-term client of Euroasia, she progressed from the Japanese Level 1 course in 2010 to the Japanese Advanced class with Takako. We talk to Heather about her wide range of interests in food/acting/singing/learning.

heather warneWhat do you do professionally?

I work for a charity called the Leprosy Mission – we do overseas aid and development work with people affected by leprosy. I'm also an audio-book narrator with the Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind.

What's your favourite food?

Ooh, so many options! I really love variety and trying new combinations and foods from different cultures, but a few old favourites are pizza… chocolate mousse… teppanyaki prawns with Yum Yum sauce…

What do you do when you aren't working?

I like basically any singing opportunities I can get my hands on – musical theatre, recording projects, jamming with bands. I also act, which is sometimes work and sometimes not! And of course enjoy both these things as a spectator, at concerts, theatre and movies. I probably also spend far too much time on computers.

How did you get involved in acting?

Acting is something I've done since I was a kid and been very interested in since college, so I then went on and did a degree in it at Unitec. Singing too – been singing since I was about 5, but a show I did a couple of years ago introduced me to a group of cool singers and I've since then had more training and got further involved in music, and really enjoying all the different avenues of it. I know a few songs in Japanese – it's a fun language to sing in.

What has surprised you most about learning Japanese?

How many verb forms there are… and the number of different words you use to count things!

What's the best thing to happen since you started getting into Japanese language and culture?

I suppose as far as the language, it was pretty awesome when I was watching some old Japanese movies I hadn't seen in a while and found that I wasn't always needing the subtitles. I haven't been to Japan yet – I'm sure that will be the highlight once I have!

Do people recognise you in the streets? What do they say when they do?

Haha, no I'm definitely not at that point yet! Occasionally I'll meet someone who's seen me performing on a stage before we've actually met – but never in really anonymous situations like on the street.

What's your dream job?

Singing, either on the West End or in the Tokyo jazz scene. Perhaps flitting between one and the other.

Heather with her Japanese class and Sensei Takako at the Euroasia Xmas party
Heather with her Japanese class and Takako-sensei at the Euroasia Xmas party (Dec 2011).

What's it like to be learning Japanese at Euroasia?

Really positive environment, great learning from a native speaker and everyone's there of their own accord so they're keen to have fun and also learn.

What would you tell someone who is thinking about learning Japanese?

Go for it! It's a fun language to learn – there are fiddly bits, but it's also not too hard to get your mouth around. As far as a tip, start learning kana (the writing) early – the sooner you know them, the sooner you can start practicing as you continue to learn

What's the difference between a Japanese and a Kiwi?

Hmmm… I haven't personally met a lot of Japanese people so I can't really speak from my own experience. The Japanese appear to be much more stylish, pop-culture-wise, much more outgoing. Also driven – whereas kiwis are often quite laid-back. Though if Takako-sensei is anything to go by, the Japanese must smile a lot!

zp8497586rq
Share this:

I was, like….what? – The new new English

For whatever reason, I was recently on a bus in Chile. Having a modest command of Spanish, I can usually manage a basic exchange in the language, but when the conductor addressed me, I heard bla, bla, bla and nothing more. Even when he repeated what he’d said, I didn’t catch a single word.

Annoying! Why can’t people speak their own language properly?

Sitting behind me were three young Aussie guys. I overheard their conversation, which went rather as follows:

“ Man, I was, like… what?” “I was, like… far out!” “And she was, like… what the…” “I was, like… crazy.”

And so it went on. I soon realised that, although I could identify all the words, I had absolutely no idea what they were talking about. All I caught were various parts of the verb “to be”, a

handful of “likes”, a grinding pause after every “like”, and then finally some kind of interjection.

After a while, the conversation reached its glorious, inevitable climax:

“I was, like… fuck!”

Whereupon everyone roared with laughter. Whether this meant that the trio had actually extracted some meaning from this curious exchange, or whether they were just accommodating one another, I’m not entirely sure.

Having overheard the sentence, “I was, like… fuck!” and observed the same reaction a number of times now, I’ve concluded that it inevitably produces a kind of Pavlovian chuckle. It doesn’t require interpretation. Maybe it just cheers people up – if you’re feeling down, you could perhaps recite it to yourself to see if it helps.

That said, I tried to envisage a context in which “I was, like… fuck!” had some meaning. I believe I understand the standard meaning of all four words in this utterance, but how could they come together to convey some aspect of reality? A number of curious images drifted in and out of my consciousness, but somehow failed to coalesce into anything very concrete. Still less could I attach them to the context in which the words were used – but then, as I hadn’t been able to identify a context anyway, it wasn’t very likely that I would.

But here’s another idea: maybe there’s some mystery code enabling sophisticated meaning to be extracted from a language which has apparently been reduced to about four words. Are there perhaps layers of meaning conveyed by the intonation, and has that replaced vocabulary as the primary vehicle for the conveyance of meaning? Instead of using a hundred different words, just produce “fuck” with a hundred different intonations, and meaning will be conveyed, at least to the cognoscenti, just as well.

I’m thinking now that we should rewrite the textbooks we produce for learners of English. Out goes: much of the old grammar. In comes: “to be + like + pause + interjection”. We could then add, “This construction is now used to convey meanings ranging from ‘to say’, through ‘to feel’, to ‘the reaction was’, to essentially anything at all. It has replaced 99% of the previously existing language.”

But seriously, does it matter if the English language is reduced to about four words? I have to say I’m not exactly offended by the word “fuck”: how can anyone be seriously offended by hearing a word they’ve heard thousands of times already? I do have an issue when it’s used in every sentence regardless of meaning. And I have an even bigger issue with a jarring “like” puncturing every sentence and creating a horrible staccato effect.

It seems to be mainly younger people who speak in this way. Sometimes their speech is so far removed from standard English that it really amounts to a distinct dialect – one determined not by region, class or even nationality, but by generation. Actually, if they want to speak in this way, and manage to communicate with one another, well, so be it. But I really hope they recognise that this is not standard English, and that there are contexts in which they need to switch codes and use that standard.

One such context is in communicating with non-native speakers of English. No learner of English is actually taught the construction “to be + like + pause + interjection”, and to be suddenly confronted by it must be a little dispiriting. When you learn a foreign language, you rather hope the native speakers you encounter will speak the form you’ve learnt. Dialects may well create a valuable sense of identity, but they can also exclude, and when you’re learning another language, they can drive you mad – it’s hard enough learning the standard, let alone umpteen variants.

Most English speakers make little effort to learn foreign languages; the very least we can do is to use a standard form of the language when speaking to those who do. The I-was-like-fuck! dialect may have its place, but it’s not here.

One of the travellers now approached another conductor. Speaking Spanish was obviously out of the question, so would he perhaps switch codes and try to communicate in standard English?

“Yeah, we were, like… wondering if we could, like…”

And I was, like… wondering whether English speakers deserved to

be understood at all.

Euroasia Principal Peter Chapple recently returned from a holiday in Latin America. He is currently researching the topic of optimal delivery of Spanish lessons for English speakers as part of the Euroasia curriculum development programme.

Posted via email from Euroasia

Share this:

November / December Euroasia update

OK This is going to be a long-ish post, to update you with all the goss over the past month. I have been very busy with various projects, travelling, attending all sorts of forums and events, and trying to keep up with everything else. It’s Christmas eve, and I finally get to do some blogging. I dread to think what it must be like in the shopping malls right now, so this is a welcome reprieve.

We had the annual Euroasia Christmas party late this year (11 Dec 09). We had a decent turnout of around 80 clients and friends of Euroasia, which is OK seeing we clashed with many other corporate parties. File note: next year we definitely have to do this the first week of Dec, perhaps even late-Nov. As you can see, those who managed to make it had a great time.

We didn’t

do any Christmas carols in Spanish, French, German, Chinese and Japanese like we did last year… but our team did organise some cool games. It was also a great opportunity for me to thank all our clients for their unwavering support to us over the past year. Dr John Reynolds spoke eloquently in 3 languages about his language learning experience at Euroasia.

Ken with Penang Chief Minister Lim Guan Eng and fellow businessmen from Australia..

A few months ago, I accepted an invitation to speak at the World Chinese Economic Forum in November and held in Kuala Lumpur (which happens to be my hometown). I’m really glad I went, as I managed to meet a number of very interesting people. At my session, I talked about how overseas Chinese can assist businesspeople from Western nations, including New Zealand, to access new markets in Asia generally and China specifically. I provided examples of enterprising Chinese businesspeople facilitating trade opportunities. In the past, New Zealand chicken producers had to spend money to dispose of chicken parts like chicken feet (that Westerners don’t eat, but Chinese love). Through the intervention of Chinese traders, NZ chicken producers have not only saved money from having to dispose of these chicken parts, but are now profiting from the sales of these parts. There are plenty of business opportunities in China that New Zealanders are missing out on because of the DIY mindset. A far superior approach is to collaborate with Asians who live in NZ and have an entrenched knowledge of the language and culture in the target market. I’m hoping to devote more time and energy to work on these Asia Bridge initiatives in 2010.

At the Forum, I managed to have a chat with the Penang Chief Minister, Lim Guan Eng. When he found out that I lived in NZ, he said “you Kiwis qualified for the world cup”, referring to news that New Zealand qualified for the 2010 Soccer World Cup in South Africa and demonstrating his knowledge of New Zealand. I had to break it to him that NZ also qualified for the Hockey World Cup, beating Malaysia the day before the forum.

Ken with PM John Key

Earlier this month, I attended the annual APEC Advisory Business Council (ABAC) dinner, where the PM briefs members of the business community on what happened at APEC. This year, there’s lots to say about the economy and the PM has just arrived back from the East Asia Summit, Malaysia-NZ FTA, CHOGM, and about to go to Copenhagen.

I have previously blogged about this but one funny anecdote worth sharing is from the Q%A where a guy asked a serious question “If we want to catch Australia why not just merge with them?” The PM’s response: I just got back from CHOGM where Australian PM Kevin Rudd asked me the same question. My response was I’m too busy running New Zealand to run Australia as well. This guy can be very funny. I do think John Key is more in touch with the masses than Helen Clark; and has a way with both CEOs as well as joe public. Perhaps this explains his 80% favourability rating throughout a very difficult year.

Mock up of Euroasia’s new website to be launched in 2010

In the new year, you will see the launch of Euroasia’s new website and enrolment system, which we have spent the last 2 months working on. Some people have asked us why we want to spend money on this, especially seeing this is a particularly difficult time. My response is that in order to maintain Euroasia’s position as a leading provider of foreign language courses and cross-cultural services, we have to keep investing in the business, and to keep improving our service offering, especially when times are bad. Recessions don’t last forever, and I’m optimistic that 2010 will be a spectacular year for Euroasia. As it stands, our forward bookings for 2010 are already way ahead of this time last year.

Over the next two weeks, I will spend some time hopefully relaxing and reflecting on the past year. If you’re like me, and need some help with the reflection process, I’ve found this guide pretty helpful. Ask yourself 20 questions that cover all facets of life, not just material prosperity.

Last Christmas, we produced a video compilation of Euroasia staff bringing Christmas and New Year greetings in their native languages. I hope you don’t mind me recycling (seeing it’s in vogue now) this message. Once again we wish you a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

Share this:

Lost in translation 2

Upon closer examination, Christchurch turned out to be

Following my previous post on the importance of getting translations done right, I have included some photos to further illustrate my point. I was in Shanghai last year, and at a glance saw someone wearing a t-shirt that said “Christchurch” on the back. Perhaps an ex-international student, I thought.

Upon closer examination, I cracked up in laughter.

Chinese police car
Chinese police car

And then there was this police car I saw outside a McDonald's restaurant. For a moment there, I wasn't sure if they are for real, but I can assure you they are driven by real cops. My mum could have done a better job with the spray paint. Why can't they get something so basic checked? All they needed to do was to open up a word doc and see if there's a red unde

rline.

police warning
police warning

It's endless. I came across another sign at a restaurant (with English menus, not a roadside stall).

In verbatim, the text reads:

The police warned Please use the “Auti-Theft Hook” under the table. Take care of your belongings. Shanghai railway station rigilance police station.

My wife (fiancee at the time) asked what sort of system this

is. I was also wondering what kind of sophisticated anti-theft system they installed under the table. My curiosity paid off. I didn't have to look long to discover this most effective albeit primitive theft-prevention device.

Chinese anti theft system
Chinese anti theft system

OK in the same way that we laugh at the Chinese who make all these “stupid mistakes”, they do the same with Westerners with silly tattoos and t-shirts. The difference is that the Chinese are just simply too polite to tell you 🙂

zp8497586rq
Share this:

Why bother with Spanish lessons?

Spanish classes are very popular amongst Kiwis. Many choose to kick off the year with some Spanish lessons, in preparation for an upcoming trip to South America or Spain. Some choose to learn Spanish because of business reasons. At Euroasia, we are often asked why Spanish lessons are so popular. Here are some reasons.

  • Spanish is unquestionably one of the world’s most important languages, spoken not only in Spain but also in most of the Americas, from California to Cape Horn!
  • The Spanish-speaking countries are exciting places: the cities offer a round-the-clock buzz, while the great outdoors has huge potential for adventurous outdoor activities.
  • Within the Spanish-speaking world, there is an enormous range of exciting places to visit: in Mexico and

    Central America, the cities of the Maya and the Aztecs, and resorts such as Acapulco and Cancún; in South America, the cities of the Aztecs (including Machu Picchu), the colourful Andean cultures of Peru and Bolivia, the strikingly varied landscapes of Chile and Argentina, and the cosmopolitan excitement of Buenos Aires.  Although some English is spoken, getting around is much easier with a little Spanish.

  • Spain itself is one of the world’s most popular tourist destinations, famous not only for its Mediterranean beaches, but also for its stylish cities, its well-preserved small towns, and, in the south, its

    unique Moorish heritage.  Not to mention Ibiza, with the hottest nightclub scene in Europe, if not the world!

  • The Spanish language has been the vehicle of great writers, from both Spain and Latin America.  Both areas have also been the home of world-renowned artists and, more recently, film-makers.

  • New Zealand is increasingly looking to South America for trade links, especially Chile, the most prosperous of the South American states, and the one closest to New Zealand.  Spanish speakers will be in demand in the future (in fact right now we have Kiwi businesspeople doing business in South America learning Spanish at Euroasia).
  • Young Kiwis can work in Argentina, Chile or Uruguay for one year under a working holiday scheme.  A knowledge of the Spanish language would obviously make a huge difference to anyone’s job prospects.

Find out more about Spanish lessons at Euroasia.  Or to enrol for a Spanish course, check out the Spanish timetable!

2-week intensive Spanish language courses start this week (20 January intake) and the once-a-week option kicks off early Feb. Enrol now.

zp8497586rq
Share this:

Terrorist attacks in Mumbai

Ken @ entrance to Taj Hotel
Ken @ entrance to Taj Hotel

I've just been thinking about the Mumbai terrorist attacks. It's most unfortunate that once again this act of terrorism was perpetrated by Muslim extremists. I say unfortunate not just because of the many people that died, and the damage caused to the economy. More importantly, the fragile relations between Muslims and Hindus in the world's second most populous nation will be once again put to the test. No doubt the terrorists want the Muslims and Hindus to be killing one another.

When people are angry, they can't think straight. There's now much talk about retaliatory attacks on Pakistan and other Muslim targets. The victims of this terrorist attack were not only the foreign tourists, but the locals. The terrorists want to strike fear and stir hatred in the hearts of ordinary Indians.

Leopold's Cafe in Mumbai
Leopold's Cafe

I really like India. I wonder if it's because I have some good Indian friends or simply because I thri

ve in chaos. In any case, I am saddened to see Mumbai icons such as Leopold's cafe and the Taj Hotel attacked.

My good friend Sam showed me around Mumbai 2 years ago. We went to Leopold's cafe twice, once for breakfast, and a second time on New Year's Eve, just to see how the classy Indians and foreigners celebrate the New Year. We were lucky to get a table. Being at Leopold's was certainly more fun than the night club we went to before Leopold's. I still remember vividly the scene at the packed club, where 90% of the patrons were male (Sam pointed out that the few girls who were there looked like call girls). Apparently, many girls are not allowed out at night.

Ken with Sam + mum @ Leopold's
Ken with Sam + mum @ Leopold

From walking around the streets, I can confirm that at night time there were certainly not many girls hanging out.  The Indians at Leopold's were certainly not your everyday Indians. You can tell that they are the classy ones. The Auckland equivalent would be the trendy Ponsonby-types; cool and chic, going out to see and to be seen.

We're lucky to be living in a country where the closest you get to a terrorist is when you play a game of Soldier of Fortune with your mates on Playstation 3. Sometimes I feel we need to start being more thankful for what we have and stop complaining about trivial things.

zp8497586rq
Share this: